Receive your FREE copy
of Dr. Philip S. Pinsker's book today!

I wrote this book because
too many people suffer from foot and ankle pain unnecessarily.

~ Dr. Phil Pinsker

 

REQUEST AN APPOINTMENT Online  Form

                                                                                             OR  Call today!  (724) 225- 7410 

FIND OUR OFFICE
853 Jefferson Ave
Washington, PA, 15301

Podiatrist - Washington
853 Jefferson Ave
Washington, PA 15301
(724) 225-7410
(724) 225-9469 - fax

Archive:

Tags

Categories:

By Dr. Philip Pinsker
May 29, 2014
Category: Running

Wahoo! Summer is around the corner, which means nice, warm, sunny days are ahead. The Riverview Park 5K Run in Pittsburgh, PA is coming up June 6, 2014. The course has challenging trails and paved areas for those who want to test their true grit. Running on a sunny day can be a blessing and a curse.  It’s great to be outside when the weather is nice, but running in the heat could bring some safety risks as well. Your heart rate can climb and your breathing can become rapid. This ends up causing your body to work harder than normal, which can affect your performance, but also put you at risk for injury. Take note of these tips to keep you safe.

First, be choosy about when you go outside. It may not be feasible with a work schedule or family duties, but try to run in the morning or evening when it is cooler outside. Noon to three is the peak time for the sun—a good window to avoid if possible. Second, gear up appropriately. Loose fitting running clothes with moisture-wicking properties are a must. Wear a hat to shield your eyes and head from the sun, and don’t forget waterproof sunscreen. Be sure to get enough water, and if you are running longer than 45 minutes, it is a good idea to drink a cup of a sports drink every 15 minutes.

Your body needs time to adjust to running in the heat and “learning” how to cool itself down properly. If you are new to the heat, ease in slowly by reducing your pace and intensity, and work up to your normal level gradually. You may experience heat stress if your temperature rises too high, so it may help to stop and power walk every 5-10 minutes or so to keep your temperature regulated.

Contact Philip S. Pinsker, D.P.M if you need more information or require treatment from foot pain that is interfering with your exercise. We are here to help—call our Washington, PA office at (724) 225-7410 or request an appointment online.

 

Comments: