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By contactus
July 14, 2010
Category: Uncategorized
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Have you had dry, itchy, or even reddish-colored problems with your feet lately? Chances are, you might have Athlete's foot. Athlete's foot is a very common skin infection of the foot caused by fungus. The fungus that commonly causes athlete's foot is called Trichophyton. When the feet or other areas of the body stay moist, warm, and irritated, this fungus can thrive and infect the upper layer of the skin. Fungal infections can occur anywhere on the body, including the scalp, trunk, extremities (arms and legs), hands, feet, nails, groin, and other areas.
Athlete's foot is caused by the ringworm fungus ("tinea" in medical jargon). Athlete's foot is also called tinea pedis. The fungus that causes athlete's foot can be found on many locations, including floors in gyms, locker rooms, swimming pools, nail salons, and in socks and clothing. The fungus can also be spread directly from person to person or by contact with these objects.
However, without proper growing conditions (a warm, moist environment), the fungus may not easily infect the skin. Up to 70% of the population may have athlete's foot at some time during their lives.

Athlete's foot may look like red, peeling, dry skin areas on one or both soles of the feet. Sometimes the dry flakes may spread onto the sides and tops of the feet. Most commonly the rash is localized to just the soles of the feet. The space between the fourth and fifth toes also may have some moisture, peeling, and dry flakes.
There are three common types of athlete's foot.
1. soles of the feet, also called "moccasin" type

2. between the toes, also called "interdigital" type

3. inflammatory type or blistering

Unusual cases may look like small or large blisters of the feet (called bullous tinea pedis), thick patches of dry, red skin, or calluses with redness. Sometimes, it may look like just mild dry skin without any redness or inflammation.
Athlete's foot may present as a rash on one or both feet and even involve the hand. This is a very common presentation of athlete's foot. Hand fungal infections are called tinea manuum. The exact cause of why the infection commonly only affects one hand is not known.
Athlete's foot may also be seen along with ringworm of the groin (especially in men) or hands. It is helpful to examine the feet whenever there is a fungal groin rash called tinea cruris. It is important to treat all areas of fungal infection at one time to avoid re-infection.
If you have had some of these problems or know that you do have Athlete's foot, make an appointment to see us today so we can assist you in a proper and effective way!

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